100 Days Project

Tukara: 100 days of doodling

My goal is to get back in touch with my long lost drawing skills. I aim to complete one doodle a day for the next 100 days.
*Update* My new project and goal is now to sketch one of the 100 most influential people of last century each day. This will give me an opportunity to learn more about these individuals and what they were known for. The 100 individuals are taken from the collection by TIME Magazine and information taken from Wikipedia.

Also visit: tukaramatthews.com

Day 85:

Day 85 - David Sarnoff

David Sarnoff (Belarusian: Даві́д Сарно́ў, Russian: Дави́д Сарно́в,) was a Belarusian-born American  businessman and pioneer of American radio and television. Throughout most of his career he led the Radio Corporation of America (RCA) in various capacities from shortly after its founding in 1919 until his retirement in 1970.

He ruled over an ever-growing telecommunications and consumer electronics empire that included both RCA and NBC, and became one of the largest companies in the world. Named a Reserve Brigadier General of the Signal Corps in 1945, Sarnoff thereafter was widely known as "The General."

Sarnoff is credited with Sarnoff's law, which states that the value of a broadcast network is proportional to the number of viewers.

In 1955, General Sarnoff received The Hundred Year Association of New York's Gold Medal Award "in recognition of outstanding contributions to the City of New York."

In 1959 Sarnoff was a member of the Rockefeller Brothers Fund panel to report on U.S. foreign policy. As a member of that panel and in a subsequent essay published in Life as part of its "The National Purpose" series, he was critical of the tentative stand being taken by the United States in fighting the political and psychological warfare being waged by Soviet-led international Communism against the West. He strongly advocated an aggressive, multi-faceted fight in the ideological and political realms with a determination to decisively win the Cold War.

Although a cousin's sympathetic biography earned Sarnoff's approval, there is not yet an objective, scholarly biography—one which documents its sources and draws on multiple archives.

Sarnoff retired in 1970, at the age of 79, and died the following year, aged 80. He is interred in a mausoleum featuring a stained-glass vacuum tube in Kensico Cemetery in Valhalla, New York.